(Previously on AIC: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7)

Should I stays or should I go? (Okay, really bad pun, forgive me). But seriously, why do we need foundation garments? Should I skip them? Well, from the research that I’ve done so far. NO. The point of a pair of stays (or corset, although that word didn’t come into use until the 19th Century) is to support the bust, slim the waist, and create a smooth shape. It also supports the dress, ensuring that it fits correctly.

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If this is the first post you’ve landed on: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6.

Quick recap: I’m attempting to make a Claire Fraser cosplay almost completely from scratch with my limited sewing experience.

I go through the headache, so you don’t have to.

So next on my list of items to make was the bumroll (sometimes called a hiproll). Now there was a pattern for a bum PAD with my Outlander sewing pattern, but as the name suggests, this was a pad, and I was going for as close to Claire’s actual outfit as I could, and as you can see in this deleted scene, she clearly wears a roll, rather than a pad.

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(If this is the first post you’ve landed on: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5).

So a sketch plan I think is one of the first things you should do when Cosplaying, but for some reason it never even occurred to me until now. I had a list of all the items I’d need to make or buy but this is more visual and I love it.

I stole the idea from this picture on Pinterest by Meramor (I can’t find a direct link to their Deviant or Tumblr).

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(Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3)

Previously: I’m attempting to make a Claire Fraiser cosplay with basic previous sewing experience, and trying not to lose my mind as I do it.

pockets

As my sewing patterns still haven’t arrived and I haven’t braved the rag market yet for fabric, I thought today I’d remake my pocket bags into something a little more…elegant. I rewatched the deleted scene of Claire getting dressed and realised that not only were her pocket bags much simpler than mine, but they were also larger.

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If this is the first post that you’re landing on, check out part one and part two first.

A quick recap: I’m attempting to sew a full Claire cosplay from the TV show Outlander, with basic sewing experience. Trying to stay optimistic.

Today’s element was the shift. A shift was the bottom-most layer of any outfit in the C18th. Women in this time didn’t wear knickers, and washing garments took time, so the shift would’ve been both underwear and nightshirt, and would’ve been worn a few days in a row before it was washed. Therefore it had to be strong, to withstand tough cleaning methods, whilst also breathable and soft on the bare skin beneath it.

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If this is the first post you’ve landed on. Check out part 1 first and then come back here.

So like I said in my last post, I am attempting to sew an C18th woman’s outfit for November, with very basic sewing experience.

And from the first moment that I found out of their existence, I was entranced by the idea of pocket bags.

Pocket bags are a precursor to pockets as we know them today. They’re satchel-like things that tie around a lady’s waist by a string under her skirts with slits. All the skirts also had slits in them to allow access to the pockets. I think they’re brilliant.

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So today I joined a writing forum. Well, three actually…

I guess I missed that whole “putting your thoughts out there into the void” thing about writing. I’ve never been all that great at blogging (which you already know my imaginary reader!), and there’s only so many times you can bother your friends with questions about plot, self-doubt, publishing, etc.

I also happened to be reading the acknowledgments at the end of “Me Before You” by Jojo Moyes where she thanks a writing forum by the name of “Writer’s Block”.

Cue me heading to Google.

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